Lawmakers should support small businesses during National Entrepreneurship Month

Huffington Post

Entrepreneurs are a vital component of a thriving American economy. Indeed, small businesses represent 99% of all employer firms and account for half of our nation’s jobs and economic output, and their creativity spurs innovation in all sectors of the economy. That’s why it’s important to take time to appreciate our country’s entrepreneurs during November, which is National Entrepreneurship Month.

During National Entrepreneurship Month, policymakers should recognize our nation’s innovators and job creators by taking time to address the primary issues that are holding them back, including lack of access to capital, the need to stabilize healthcare costs and fairness in tax reform efforts.

Improving access to capital is one of the most crucial issues for entrepreneurs. Small Business Majority’s polling found 90 percent of small business owners identify access to capital as a top concern. This finding is no surprise given that many small business owners are still struggling to access capital post-recession. And when small businesses are approved for loans, it’s often not for the full amount requested. In fact, the Federal Reserve found of those small business owners who did receive a loan, only half were approved for the full amount requested. Continue reading

Even some Republicans agree tax plans won’t help small businesses

The Hill

When it comes to the tax reform proposals being promoted by congressional Republicans, one of their own has come out against the plans because they won’t do much for America’s small businesses.

“We can’t leave anybody behind, which is why they came up with the 25 [percent] rate for pass throughs,” Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) said, himself a former small-business owner. “The problem is, neither the House or the Senate version really honored that commitment to pass-through businesses, which I argue are a huge engine of economic growth.”

Sen. Johnson is exactly right about the role of small businesses in our economy, and he’s right that neither the Senate nor the House of Representatives have offered proposals that would help more than a handful of small firms, while also blowing up the deficit by adding $1.5 trillion over 10 years.
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